Choked Out on the Mat

  BJJ, Judo, and Submission wrestling allow you to apply chokeholds to your opponent either using your arms, legs, or the gi. Occasionally this results in temporary unconsciousness. The time it takes to render an opponent unconscious depends on how well the technique is applied and various physiological factors. There has never been a death Read More …

Positional Flow Drilling

  Several months ago I put together some positional flow charts for our competition team. They describe which positional transitions score points in the typical Brazilian jiu-jitsu tournament. This provides a roadmap of where to go next in order to build up a score and play the submission game while you are ahead on points. Read More …

Judo for BJJ

  Several years ago my friend Aaron Little of Performance Edge (www.truthincombat.com) and I put together a DVD on the application of common judo throws for jiu-jitsu practitioners. The DVD is still available for sale at his site, but has made the rounds, both in part and whole, onto the internet. This is one portion Read More …

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and Self-Defense

  Grappling in general, and Brazilian jiu-jitsu in particular, is an excellent nucleus for solid defensive tactics, combatives, and self-defense. Certainly striking is a large component of a complete approach but the fundamental control of balance and position can help see you through most situations. The main difference between sport and street martial arts is Read More …

Strength Training for Grappling Athletes

  Strength and conditioning is a fundamental supplement to any athletic activity including judo, jiu-jitsu, and other grappling arts. Check out this article I wrote for www.mixedmartialworld.com on an effective strength training program for the hard-training grappling athlete. The key to effective programming for grapplers is to realize that the volume of resistance training must Read More …

Strong Foundations

  The beginner thinks, “I will attempt a technique”, and while thinking misses the opportunity. In a similar fashion the intermediate practitioner thinks, “I am doing a technique”, and being oriented in the present is sometimes successful. The expert, however, after felling an opponent thinks, “I have just completed a technique”. The above example illustrates Read More …

The Element of Surprise

  Surprise provides a definite tactical advantage. Fairness dictates that we not ambush our training partners or other tournament competitors as they step onto the mat. So how then can we gain the element of surprise when the opponent knows where we are? We move when we aren’t supposed to. Each match has its own Read More …